1. Welcome to Photography Forum. Our photography community!

    Photography-forum is dedicated to those who have passion, desire and love of photography and want to improve their photographic technique. It doesn't matter what you photograph, landscapes, weddings, portraits or your photographic experience, it's about learning and loving what we do. Photography!

    If you want learn and expand your photography skills then there is one place to do it Photography Forum !!!

    You are viewing photography-forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view most forums and enjoy other features. By joining our free community you will be able to post photographs for critique, join in the monthly photography competitions, respond to polls, upload content and enjoy many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please join Photography Forum.

    If you have any problems please contact us.

    The Photography-Forum Team
    Dismiss Notice
  2. PLEASE SEE RULES BEFORE POSTING LINKS
    Click here to see Forum Rules

Black background portrait shots

Discussion in 'PhotoShop & Editing Tips, Tricks and Tutorials For' started by LoloBean, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. LoloBean

    LoloBean Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    6
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Hi! Could anyone provide some tips on creating a black background to portrait photographs (of dogs and horses)? I'd like to use Photoshop to also graduate the effect so it looks as though the animal has stepped out of a dark room. I've attached an image as reference. Thanks!

    (Attachment removed due to copyright concerns)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2018
  2. Roger S

    Roger S Crazy Canuck Administrator

    Messages:
    60,156
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    First off, is that your photo? If not, it's copyright infringement without the artist's permission. What you should do is put in a link to it rather than sharing a photo which is not yours. (You can post links right after you have 5 posts on this forum.)

    Now, I think the guy who is our resident expert on this type of stuff would be @pauln . I'm sure he will be along soon.
     
    pauln likes this.
  3. LoloBean

    LoloBean Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    6
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Hi Roger S. Perhaps there's a misunderstanding somewhere as this is a screenshot including the artists name which I'm not implying is my work, my understanding is this sits within fair use. I'll be sure to use links in future to be safe. Thank you
     
  4. pauln

    pauln Always on

    Messages:
    7,428
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Thank you for the warm introduction, Roger :)
    Right, there's many ways in which you can achieve this type of image. You can do it with flash and underexposing your image, you can cut out and replace the background, you can use a black background to name a few but the method I came up with is to use adjustment brushes and radial filters and it's actually quite simple. All of the tools I use can be found in Photoshop CC, I start by opening an image into ACR ( adobe camera raw ) then, on the right hand panel, I pull my exposure, blacks and whites all the way down to the left and push my contrast all the way up to the right, this then gives you your black colour with which to paint in your background. Now that I have my base colour I click on the radial filter found at the top of the ACR panel ( it looks like this 0 ) I then take my cursor into the centre of the image and drag it outwards creating a vignette around the image, its this that gives the image dimension as if it's coming out of the darkness. Once I'm happy with how it looks I click on the adjustment brush located next to the radial filter at the top of ACR, with that I select a flow of 100 and leave the rest as default, next I click on the left hand arrow on the histogram, this arrow deals with blacks clipping, by clicking on it everything I paint in black will show as blue on my screen so I can see where my edges are more clearly. Next I continue to paint around the subject paying close attention not to paint over the edge, once I'm happy I click the blacks clipping triangle again and everything I've painted turns black. If after this I am happy with the results I continue with the rest of the pp.
    Very simple once you get used to it but it will make all the difference compared to a perfectly cut out subject pasted onto a black background.
    Hope that helps IMG_20180610_100919.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
    Mike Singh, MikeB, Roger S and 2 others like this.
  5. LoloBean

    LoloBean Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    6
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Thank you. That's very helpful! Having played around with a couple of images the only challenge I'm having is creating realistic edges, especially where mane/forelock hair and hair around whiskers and ears meets the edges of the subject. I imagine this is made worse by the background being considerably lighter than the subject? Any other tips on painting around the subject for a realistic finish?

    _DSC0008.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2018
  6. pauln

    pauln Always on

    Messages:
    7,428
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    For hair, whiskers or fur you need to do 3 things...
    1. Zoom in, don't be afraid to zoom in the get right up to the edge, sometimes I'll zoom in as much as 300% just to get a good edge.
    2. Exposure, you can change the exposure of your adjustment brush to accommodate for fine edges.
    3. Dodge and burn, once you've got your rough edge on fur or hair open the file in to Photoshop and create a new dodge and burn layer. Set your opacity to around 4% then work in the fine edges.
    I also use a graphics tablet and pen as well as an adjustable monitor, my monitor can turn 180 deg so it makes it easier to get up to vertical edges
     
    Roger S likes this.
  7. pauln

    pauln Always on

    Messages:
    7,428
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    If all else fails, fake it. Open a new layer and draw on your whiskers or hair and overlay them on to the original as I done in this old image
    IMG_20171204_203125.jpg 20180804_121641.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
    gaelldew and Roger S like this.
  8. pauln

    pauln Always on

    Messages:
    7,428
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Here's another image to show you what you should see on your screen if you click the black clipping (shadow) triangle. It's a before and after pic, unfortunately I've had to screen shot it from my Instagram as I don't have the original on my phone anymore Screenshot_20180804-131750_Instagram-518x1065.jpg
     
  9. LoloBean

    LoloBean Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    6
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Brilliant advice, thank you! I've played around more with my image and whilst it's not perfect in pleased with the first shot at achieving the 'look'. FB_IMG_1533501334512.jpeg
     
    Scoob100, DonS, gaelldew and 2 others like this.
  10. pauln

    pauln Always on

    Messages:
    7,428
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Looks pretty good to me, maybe a touch more light on the ears and it's a winner :)
     
  11. Ramble Vision

    Ramble Vision Mountain Climber Super Moderator

    Messages:
    24,969
    Edit my images ?:
    No
    nice one. the finished thing has turned our great
     

Share This Page