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I bought this one on the left NEW when it first came out

paulmag

Always on
Honorary Life Member
I had new from 1976 but eventually it lost accuracy due to aging and i sold as non working needed a new sensor bit
 
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SeanNeedham

Ol' Sparky
Honorary Life Member
I've had many of these pay for my weekend fun before... Usually starts with the immortal line of "I've just bought..." and then ends with "Sean, can you fix it?"
 

Snips

Always on
Serious question: How do you use it? My parents had one and I looked at it a few years ago but it didn't seem to do anything and it wasn't broken.
 

Ozzie_Traveller

Old Hand
Premium Member
Serious question: How do you use it? My parents had one and I looked at it a few years ago but it didn't seem to do anything and it wasn't broken.
After pre-setting the ISO value for the film in use, you point towards subject - the red needle responds to reflected light & moves across the dial to an EV number - you align the rotary scale to the EV number on one side of the dial and the other side of the dial shows a series of speed & aperture combinations for you to select a matching pair

There often is a hinged 'window' on the front of the device - press a release button and the low-light scale comes into play with the same needle movement plus EV number alignment to follow

Hope this helps
Phil
 

Snips

Always on
Thank you and yes, it does. I think the one I used probably wasn’t working as nothing seemed to move . Might have another look one day
 

SeanNeedham

Ol' Sparky
Honorary Life Member
Thank you and yes, it does. I think the one I used probably wasn’t working as nothing seemed to move . Might have another look one day
The light sensitive element does desensitise after a while, the selenium cells do fail due to things like heat, damp, light (that's a bit ironic when you see camera collectors with their old machines lined up on shelves, they are killing them just by showing them off).
I've fixed quite a few, and whilst it is still possible to buy selenium photovoltaic cells, I'd say by the time it's been fixed (in parts and the time for someone to fix it) you'd be well on your way to buying a modern meter!
 

Snips

Always on
Thank you Phil and Sean - I've not seen it for a few years but suspect it was bought in the 1950's so probably not surprising that it didn't seem to work. I'll try to remember to look again when I next visit my mother.
 

MikeB

Always on
Premium Member
Nice collector's items. Good for nostalgia. These were excellent tools before in-camera light meters became good enough to use. I've used a couple of Weston light meters in the 70s - they don't compare to the ease of using the current crop of digital light meters or in accuracy and usefulness.
 

skyhawk

Member
Nice collector's items. Good for nostalgia. These were excellent tools before in-camera light meters became good enough to use. I've used a couple of Weston light meters in the 70s - they don't compare to the ease of using the current crop of digital light meters or in accuracy and usefulness.

As I said I use mine all the time when shooting landscapes especially for incident readings


.
 

hooferinsane

EXIF Seeker
Super Moderator
I used to collect old light meters, had a few of the weston masters, such fun to use. The only light meter I could never work out how to use was a Jessops own brand lightmeter. Trawled the internet for ever to find an instruction manual to no avail, even Jessops themselves couldn't help. Drove me crazy trying to work it out to the point that I had to hide it away or risk being admitted to a psychiatric institution :). Quite often those weston masters could be purchased with a weston invercone as can be seen in your shot for measuring incident light.
@rebel06 you probably realise that yours is of Soviet origin, had one of those too. Some old Russian kit was good fun, had a Zorki camera that had a clockwork shutter.
 

rebel06

Looking for a cause.
Moderator
I used to collect old light meters, had a few of the weston masters, such fun to use. The only light meter I could never work out how to use was a Jessops own brand lightmeter. Trawled the internet for ever to find an instruction manual to no avail, even Jessops themselves couldn't help. Drove me crazy trying to work it out to the point that I had to hide it away or risk being admitted to a psychiatric institution :). Quite often those weston masters could be purchased with a weston invercone as can be seen in your shot for measuring incident light.
@rebel06 you probably realise that yours is of Soviet origin, had one of those too. Some old Russian kit was good fun, had a Zorki camera that had a clockwork shutter.
Yes Brian it's Russian, and I managed to find the instructions online .
 

Footski

Here a lot
I have a Weston Master 5, in its original box and never used apart from me testing it last year with an old Box Brownie. Still very accurate and the leather case still smells new. It could be sold as brand new, but no way will I part with it.
 

skyhawk

Member
I have a Weston Master 5, in its original box and never used apart from me testing it last year with an old Box Brownie. Still very accurate and the leather case still smells new. It could be sold as brand new, but no way will I part with it.

I always found the 5 very confusing to use, they tried to put far too much on the dial, being autistic I gave up
 

BriPriUK

Member
Sadly they are worth very little now a the selenium cells deteriorate with age. If you have one that is still accurate, hang on to it and use it :).
Really good ones go for about £10, but you can get one refurbished and calibrated for around £140, after which it is worth about £60:(

Brian
 

skyhawk

Member
What you need to remember is that new meters are on sale all over from £150 to £1000 and used all the time by photographers, whilst used ones may be less expensive, top quality onesd like Weston and Gossen rarely go wrong and both the ones I have are totally accurate, I meter with them to this very day, recently I checked them against a Minolta Flash Meter V :)

I can not over state how easy it is (for me anyway, and at these prices anyone should have one) to use for landscape.

NO hand held meter, you check the exposure, insert the filters, I use 10 stop Lee and grads, this takes time, set them up, hope lighting has not changed then expose.

WITH hand held meter, insert and set filters, only when you are ready METER and instantly expose no delay

As for cells failing with age, I sold my collection of Weston meters two years ago, I was the ONLY person to have every single meter from the first to the last, about 40, all 100% working, yes 100%, and as I said I bought the one on the right NEW in 1973 ...........44 years ago, as accurate today as

Oh and why is it called the Euro Master

The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (as it then was) on 1 January 1973 with Denmark and Ireland.... hence WESTON Euro - MASTER.



I305894
 
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