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Lee Seven5 or 100mm for M43?

Discussion in 'Photography Chat Forum' started by Purn, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. Purn

    Purn Active Member

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    Hi guys. I'm in the market for some ND/ND grad filters and am a little conflicted about where to invest my money.

    I'm currently shooting an Olympus EM5mkii, with the 12-40mm Pro lens, with the intention of purchasing the 7-14mm in the near future.

    I'd intended to purchase the Lee Seven5 deluxe kit, but am a little concerned about limitations with regard to wide lenses due to the smaller filter size. I've been led to believe that the seven5 system can potentially cause vignetting at focal lengths less than 18mm. Have any of you guys had any experience with this?

    Also, due to the protrusion of the 7-14 lens' glass, it is only possible to fit a 100mm filter.

    Due the above mentioned issues, I'm seriously considering going for a full size 100mm filter kit. Would the gradations be too much for the smaller lens sizes of the M43 system? And would weight also be an issue?

    Many thanks for taking the time to read. Any experience and advice would be greatly welcomed before I drop £500 on my chosen system. X
     
  2. DonS

    DonS Stuck in Toronto Moderator

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    I would honestly ignore the ND Grad filters and use bracketing then merge in software. I never use my ND Grads anymore, way too much hassle to carry them (being rectangular they have a larger case), mount, and line up. I just took a quick google and it looks like you will have a hard time with any type of filter with the 7-14, it does not have a filter thread. You can get this: http://www.philnortonphotography.co.uk/olympus-714-adapter.html made just for that lens.
     
    fmw likes this.
  3. Jason

    Jason Always on Premium Member

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    Are you likely to go to a larger sensor anytime in the future? If yes then there is your answer - future proof your purchase. Tbh, I’m with Don on this one - I’d rather bracket if the range of the scene is extreme.
     
  4. Phill104

    Phill104 Old Hand Premium Member

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    I’ve just started using the Nisi V5pro 100mm system which is compatible with the aforementioned adapter for that lens. When I used the Lee system I got quite a bit of the dreaded dark corners on my Canon 10-22 and even on the 17-55 when using the 105mm polariser. Switching to the Nisi the problem is gone due to the rear mounted polariser. My Lee holder I gave to a friend along with the 105mm polariser rather than leave it to gather dust in a drawer somewhere.
     
  5. MikeB

    MikeB Always on Premium Member

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    You can achieve some great shots using ND filters but, if you're shooting digital, you can't beat the versatility of doing brackets. Even with a filter, if the light is right shooting a bracket may still be helpful.
     
  6. Purn

    Purn Active Member

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    Thank you all for your responses. How does bracketing cope with longer exposures and cloud movement etc? That's always put me off. Have Hdr mergers become that good now? (I've been out of the game for a while!)
     
  7. Jason

    Jason Always on Premium Member

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    The HDR function in Lightroom is, imho, very good. It’s a lot better than Photomatix used to be. It gives a cleaner result and a good ‘flat’ image to base your edit on. Tbh, if I do blend, I just use Photoshop and a soft brush and a layer mask.
     
  8. DonS

    DonS Stuck in Toronto Moderator

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    You will still want ND filters, we are just recommending against ND grads. HDR merges work well. I can select the photos in Lightroom and right click "Merge to HDR" and they come out very realistic since it does minimal to no tone mapping.
     
  9. fmw

    fmw Active Member

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    Agreed. I've been doing photography for more than 1/2 century both professionally and otherwise. I have never used nor owned a graduated ND filter - even in the film days. In the digital age you can handle anything a graduated filter can do in editing software with better results.
     
  10. Purn

    Purn Active Member

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    Again, thanks for all of your advice.
    So in regard to bracketing and solid ND filters, would it be permissible for example to shoot a sea scape, with a 10 stop filter installed, 5 bracketed shots, half a stop apart? Would there not be merging issues with water movement, assuming the water isn't completely flattened from the long exposure?
     
  11. Jason

    Jason Always on Premium Member

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    Most HDR software has an anti-ghosting feature, or whatever they call it. The Lightroom version works well. You can always fix any errors by selecting the best exposure from your bracketed set and layermask/blend it in by hand to repair.
     
  12. Phill104

    Phill104 Old Hand Premium Member

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    Of course there will be ghosting, but like you say, only if the exposure is a long one. If there is, it is usually easy to mask out. Why would you want to do that?
     
  13. MikeB

    MikeB Always on Premium Member

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    I've bracketed long-exposure shots using a 10-stop and find that the bracket was usually a waste of time. An exception is when you're just not sure how you want the water (or clouds) to look so you are just giving yourself options. HDR with such a bracket is possible, but also a waste of time. I found that I was better off when I had such a bracket to pick and choose what I like using Layers and Masks.
     

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