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My First Foray into > 1:1 Macro Photography

RobertG

Member
While I know these do not compare to the many extreme and extremely excellent macro shots here, I was incredibly excited to capture these images on my neighbor's rose plant. The first is a Cucumber beetle, I believe; and the second I believe is a jumping spider (at least he jumped around a lot as I was trying to photograph him!),
Equipment for these shots consists of a Tokina 100mm macro with Raynox DCR 250 lens attachment and camera flash with a white cloth diffusion material.
Finally, my gratitude to these patient insects for posing on this overcast day! RobertCucumber-Beetle-S.jpgJumping-Spider-S.jpg
 

RobertG

Member
Thank you all for your kind comments - I just received the Raynox in the post a few days ago and was anxious to try it out. Ended up with a dozen or so decent shots of the spider, but this was my favorite. All shots were hand-held, so a bit challenging as you all already know! Thanks for the inspiration I am finding here, and looking forward to more macro work - definitely "hooked"!
 

Ozzie_Traveller

Old Hand
Premium Member
G'day Robert

Your pics are excellent - as others above have already mentioned ... well done
I see that you are using the Raynox-250 close-up lens, and 'congratulations' again

I enjoy using close-up lenses too, and on another thread here a few days ago, we had a short discussion about them

For your reference [if you are not aware] the Raynox-250 is a "+4 dioptre" lens with a focal length of 1/4-metre, meaning that when it's on your camera lens with that main lens set to infinity, the new combo will focus at 1/4-metre. By using the main lens's focus mechanism you can focus a bit closer ~ probably down to 1/5-metre or 8-inches if you still work in inches.

It is a really beaut way of getting closeups ~ don't forget to create adequate depth-of-field via good selection of Aperture :)

Phil
 

kayak

Always on
Nice shots! I've recently been doing a lot of macro photography. The smaller the insect, the more you'll get in focus with a shallow DOF. I found that once I go above the size of a bee, I get a better shot with my standard kit lens.
 

RobertG

Member
G'day Robert

Your pics are excellent - as others above have already mentioned ... well done
I see that you are using the Raynox-250 close-up lens, and 'congratulations' again

I enjoy using close-up lenses too, and on another thread here a few days ago, we had a short discussion about them

For your reference [if you are not aware] the Raynox-250 is a "+4 dioptre" lens with a focal length of 1/4-metre, meaning that when it's on your camera lens with that main lens set to infinity, the new combo will focus at 1/4-metre. By using the main lens's focus mechanism you can focus a bit closer ~ probably down to 1/5-metre or 8-inches if you still work in inches.

It is a really beaut way of getting closeups ~ don't forget to create adequate depth-of-field via good selection of Aperture :)

Phil
Thanks Phil for the nice comments and info. I will look for the other thread. I realized a bit too late I was not focused at infinity - I had been focused at closest distance (got too excited!). I did try a few at infinity just before the spider decided he'd had enough, but never got better than the front legs in focus. I was shooting at F16, but will try smaller aperture next time (and monopod?!) with larger magnification. Boy what fun though!! Cheers!

Nice shots! I've recently been doing a lot of macro photography. The smaller the insect, the more you'll get in focus with a shallow DOF. I found that once I go above the size of a bee, I get a better shot with my standard kit lens.
Thanks for the encouragement! I am really looking forward to experimenting with the Raynox and a telephoto lens as they recommend. Cheers!
 

gaelldew

Always on
Premium Member
@RobertG Hope you dont mind Robert, thought you might like it a little larger, Topaz Gigapixel AI. Just say if you mind and I'll remove it.

x-robert-g.jpg
 

RobertG

Member
@RobertG Hope you dont mind Robert, thought you might like it a little larger, Topaz Gigapixel AI. Just say if you mind and I'll remove it.

Garth, thank you!! Very grateful for your effort!! Cheers!
One additional shot now that a friend helped me identify what it is, a Mayfly. The equipment used was a Nikon 60mm Micro with the R1 Nikon macro flash attachment, 1:1 reproduction ratio on the lens.
Mayfly.jpg
 

Luc

Here a lot
While I know these do not compare to the many extreme and extremely excellent macro shots here, I was incredibly excited to capture these images on my neighbor's rose plant. The first is a Cucumber beetle, I believe; and the second I believe is a jumping spider (at least he jumped around a lot as I was trying to photograph him!),
Equipment for these shots consists of a Tokina 100mm macro with Raynox DCR 250 lens attachment and camera flash with a white cloth diffusion material.
Finally, my gratitude to these patient insects for posing on this overcast day! RobertView attachment 306466View attachment 306467
Very good first try
 

RobertG

Member
Thank you all for the kind comments and encouragement - I have a long way to go, but thrilled with the journey so far! Cheers!
 

Pete.Bony

Active Member
I'm not experienced enough to pass much comment on the technicalities of the shots but you have achieved some very good results, I like them. I too use a Raynox DCR-250 and find it a cracking little "close up lens" to use" on my Vivitar 100 Macro lens - Or even on other lenses I have with extension tubes when needed, the Raynox (In my opinion) was worth every penny I paid for it.
 

RobertG

Member
I'm not experienced enough to pass much comment on the technicalities of the shots but you have achieved some very good results, I like them. I too use a Raynox DCR-250 and find it a cracking little "close up lens" to use" on my Vivitar 100 Macro lens - Or even on other lenses I have with extension tubes when needed, the Raynox (In my opinion) was worth every penny I paid for it.
Hi Pete,
Thanks for the nice comments, and I agree about the Raynox. I was hesitant and a bit skeptical of the supposed results, but it really is some high-quality glass. Early days yet, but so far quite happy with it! Cheers!
 
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