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Phone Cameras

arteta

Always on
Just upgraded my phone to a Huawei and am absolutely blown away by the IQ from the camera. Everything from incredibly high ISO (for a small sensor) to the super macro to the gorgeous skin tones, and an editor that's very impressive.
I haven't thrown them in PS yet and looked at the pixels but will do
I know there's more to taking a good exposure than the camera itself but how will this affect the future of professional natural light photographers when everyones walking round with these things in their pockets? And they'll only keep getting better.
 

Mike Singh

Always on
Premium Member
Very good photo with the composition and facial expression that makes the photo. My iPhone takes great photos in balanced flat lighting. It will struggle with any high dynamic range situation. I really like the portrait mode which blurs the background.
“The best camera is the one you have with you”
 

pinhole

Member
The phone camera's are coming on leaps and bounds. It's especially evident in the their software.

My Pixel 3 phone has a night mode that will spend a few seconds taking in the light (basically a really long exposure) with really good software based image stabilisation, and then produce an image from all the layed exposures.

I took a shot of my garden at night, I couldn't see the end of it but the phone created a picture of the entire garden like it was only dusk and I could see every detail with no camera shake. Pretty amazing tech.

Also the use of 'photosphere' and panorama modes means wide angle lenses aren't needed. A phone will never take over a DSLR, but I do think the bridge camera's that will utilise this software will.
 

arteta

Always on
Thanks for all your replies. I agree with all you've said. I'm not sure whether my post came across as perhaps a little too negative about the future of the industry but I do think it will change it.
I can see the market being even more flooded with photographers who have picked up a strong interest from using their phones.
For photographers who are determined to succeed in their field, other factors are going to be more vital than they have ever been, especially their business model and marketing. It'll be a lot more tougher for newcomers breaking into the market and their work will need to differentiate from their competitors. All the things that are relevant today but even more so
 

Activ8

I made the 1,000,000 th post
I think computational photography will be the next growth area for the industry. Given enough data from high density high speed sensors and lot's of computing power like we are seeing in the latest phones. The traditional bounds of iso noise, sensor size and depth of field will become meaningless! You press the shutter and within a fraction of a second the camera has taken 36 photographs... bracketed them for exposure pixel shifted them for colour and noise reduction and stacked them for depth of field! No skill needed other than composition.
 

arteta

Always on
I think computational photography will be the next growth area for the industry. Given enough data from high density high speed sensors and lot's of computing power like we are seeing in the latest phones. The traditional bounds of iso noise, sensor size and depth of field will become meaningless! You press the shutter and within a fraction of a second the camera has taken 36 photographs... bracketed them for exposure pixel shifted them for colour and noise reduction and stacked them for depth of field! No skill needed other than composition.
Totally agree. I think some phone cameras can even trigger flashes now too can't they? And who knows in a few years time, most new phones will. Where will this push the dslr market?

I know your average Joe won't be walking round with flashes and light stands but some probably will

What's computational photography Dave?
 

Activ8

I made the 1,000,000 th post
What's computational photography Dave?
It is where the image is manipulated in the camera by software to create the final image. In a basic sense the jpeg engines are computational photography that creates the jpg from raw data. In phones we see it via things like snapchat filters and portrait modes of phones. Most cameras do lens correction and CA correction now before they even create the RAW file so in a lot of cases the raw is not a true raw anymore.
 

pinhole

Member
It'll be a lot more tougher for newcomers breaking into the market and their work will need to differentiate from their competitors. All the things that are relevant today but even more so
It's not just that, I think it becomes ever more difficult for pro's to make a living.

For example in the days of film, pro's could earn a decent little wage on the side from stock photo's. Simply the introduction of digital made it possible for complete amateurs to get decent shots, because of the ability to "machine gun" shots and hope at least one of them is a winner.

With film you simply couldn't do that and there was a lot more skill needed to get the shot you want. Now even moderate decent hobbyists could set themselves up for things like weddings etc and as long as they have a good enough knowledge to not mess things up completely, can fill a memory card with shots and simply through the laws of averages will have enough usable shots (you'd hope) to keep the customer happy.

That said, it means that composition is still everything, because the technicalities are less important (due to camera's taking that over if you see what I mean), so someone with a natural eye for it will still be able to stand out.
 

Newbandit

Always on
Technology always makes people redundant. It's a blessing and a curse. Fast forward another 10 years or so and photography as we know it will be dead. Harder for Pro's but fun for everyone else. I think the money is in video these days not stills.
 

Petrochemist

Always on
Perhaps a level playing field will only encourage people to take more pictures instead of obsessing over gear all the time?
Retirement might, but when at work I can't go round taking photos, obsessing over gear is easy to fit into tea breaks etc.
Not only that but IMO it's more fun than snapping away with a cell phone.
 
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