1. Welcome to Photography Forum. Our photography community!

    Photography-forum is dedicated to those who have passion, desire and love of photography and want to improve their photographic technique. It doesn't matter what you photograph, landscapes, weddings, portraits or your photographic experience, it's about learning and loving what we do. Photography!

    If you want learn and expand your photography skills then there is one place to do it Photography Forum !!!

    You are viewing photography-forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view most forums and enjoy other features. By joining our free community you will be able to post photographs for critique, join in the monthly photography competitions, respond to polls, upload content and enjoy many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please join Photography Forum.

    If you have any problems please contact us.

    The Photography-Forum Team
    Dismiss Notice
  2. PLEASE SEE RULES BEFORE POSTING LINKS
    Click here to see Forum Rules

Please explain printing to me

Discussion in 'Forum Printing Service & Questions Forum' started by R1CH, Apr 6, 2017.

  1. R1CH

    R1CH Member

    Messages:
    23
    Edit my images ?:
    No
    Hi all,

    Firstly I've read/watched a fair bit about this so I'm not entirely ignorant but I still have questions....

    I have started to print my images with varying degrees of success (I use a local printing lab). The first set I sent I did blind without any appreciation of free cropping and the impact it has. I niaevely thought that in 2017 my digital photography wouldn't be restricted by the paper industry. Anyway, what is the best way to do this in Lightroom? I use a crop sensor Nikon which I believe uses 2:3 ratio. So if I lock my cropping to that ratio I'll be golden right? I can then order prints in any 2:3 ratio?? 4x6, 8x12, 10x15, 12x18, and so forth? Really hope this is correct. If I want any other size do I just set this as required? Do I keep PPI to 300?

    In my most recent order I asked for a white border around my images but when it arrived it was uneven. I followed the above formula so why did this happen?
    Also, which file format can I send them? The DNG or should I just send JPEG? It seems difficult to get clear info on this. Each video or article I read deals with every little element and not everything I need to know.

    I'd really appreciate any help
     
    Lee74c3 likes this.
  2. Snips

    Snips Always on

    Messages:
    36,635
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Unless you're looking for 100% complete accuracy on things like calibrating your screen and matching print profiles and all manner of other things, in my experience it's much simpler and I've only had one difficulty once when trying to get a dark photograph printed. It turned out that printing dark photographs is not easy.

    Your ratios are correct. In addition if you want a 10"x8" photograph then you'll notice this ratio is 5:4. If a printing company (or printer) has the option it doesn't present too much of a problem. If you save a file as a jpeg and with the colour profile sRGB then the printing company can usually make a good job of it.

    The 300 DPI (dots per inch and not pixels per inch) is what you're aiming for but a few pixels will be missing because PPI (what one sees on the screen) and DPI (what one sees in print) are slightly different. To print a 12"x8' photograph you're looking for 12x300 by 8x300 which is 3600px x 2400px. With a 10"x8" the dimensions of the jpg would be 3000px x 2400px.

    In my experience with my printing you can go down to around 150DPI and I've not noticed any image quality difference. So if your final jpg is only 2100px along it's longest side and it's a 10"x8" photograph you want printing then the DPI is 210 but you will still be able to print it without noticeable loss of image quality.

    Re the white border, I put a border around one of my photographs and it came out not central and missed entirely on another photograph. There must be a formula for the EXACT size in pixels somewhere but every time I've searched I just see 300DPI. I also suspect it might vary from printer to printer.
     
    Lee74c3 likes this.
  3. R1CH

    R1CH Member

    Messages:
    23
    Edit my images ?:
    No
    What a brilliant reply thank you. I think I will order borderless from here on.
    I've not even thought about frames just yet as that appears to open up even more variables....border, no border....
     
    Snips likes this.
  4. Ramble Vision

    Ramble Vision Mountain Climber Super Moderator

    Messages:
    25,577
    Edit my images ?:
    No
    I find it best to leave nothing to chance and make the border myself. all you need to do is size and crop the the photograph to the size you want, EG 15" x 10" or whatever size you want, doesn't need to be a standard ratio.

    Then in photoshop its just a matter of changing the canvas size, for this I select the next standard size up i.e 18 x 12 this creates the border and leaves the image dead centre. then if you wish you can move image around or add a title underneath what ever. but when you send the image to printers and ask for an 18 x 12 print you will get exactly what you want, no surprises.
     
    R1CH and Lee74c3 like this.
  5. balami

    balami Always on Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,399
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    In terms of cropping, sites such as Photobox allow you to preview your prints, and thus you can see what (if any) cropping being applied will look like.
     
    R1CH and Lee74c3 like this.
  6. R1CH

    R1CH Member

    Messages:
    23
    Edit my images ?:
    No
    Thanks. I am starting to I understand it. I'm hoping to have some images for sale soon. I was worried about this printing minefield but I think that if each image is cropped to a requested/specific size prior to printing I can't go far wrong.....

    Do you print jpep?
     
  7. R1CH

    R1CH Member

    Messages:
    23
    Edit my images ?:
    No
    I guess this is all to do with the relationship between full frames cameras, printing and frames.
     

Share This Page