1. Welcome to Photography Forum. Our photography community!

    Photography-forum is dedicated to those who have passion, desire and love of photography and want to improve their photographic technique. It doesn't matter what you photograph, landscapes, weddings, portraits or your photographic experience, it's about learning and loving what we do. Photography!

    If you want learn and expand your photography skills then there is one place to do it Photography Forum !!!

    You are viewing photography-forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view most forums and enjoy other features. By joining our free community you will be able to post photographs for critique, join in the monthly photography competitions, respond to polls, upload content and enjoy many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please join Photography Forum.

    If you have any problems please contact us.

    The Photography-Forum Team
    Dismiss Notice
  2. PLEASE SEE RULES BEFORE POSTING LINKS
    Click here to see Forum Rules

Problems photographic small objects

Discussion in 'Photography & Camera Basics Forum' started by Hekainu, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. Hekainu

    Hekainu New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Hi everyone,

    I need to photograph some small archaeological finds but I'm having trouble getting sharp images. The camera seems to be focusing but the images aren't really very well focused.

    I'm using a height adjustable camera mount with two lamps for lighting. My camera is a nikon D72000 and I have two lenses: Nikkor AF-S 18-105mm and Sigma DG Macro 105mm.

    I've tried changing the distance of the camera from subject and using different focal lengths, changing the apeture, changing the lighting, changing lenses etc but nothing seems to work. I especially can't figure out why I have this problem with the Macro lens as I would have thought it would be ideal for this sort of task but even that is producing fuzzy photos.

    I'll attach example photos to this thread.

    Any advice would be much appreciated!

    DSC_9264 reduced.jpg DSC_9284 reduced.jpg DSC_9288 reduced.jpg
     
  2. Snips

    Snips Always on Premium Member

    Messages:
    35,428
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    If you can find some post processing software (Lightroom, Elements, Photoshop, GIMP and many others) you'll find a sharpening tool in the kit somewhere. This is all you probably need in the first two images.

    The third might require a re-take.

    Also might be worth looking up focus stacking in YouTube. Here's one to get you started:
     
  3. hooferinsane

    hooferinsane EXIF Seeker Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,592
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Hi and welcome to the forum
    First thing first, assume your height adjustable mount is just like a tripod. When you use a tripod you have to make sure image stabilisation is turned OFF on the lens. Also using a remote shutter release should be used to reduce camera shake, I would think the 105mm macro would be the best option - how stable is the camera mount?

    I have made your images full size for you, dont forget to press full image when you upload
     
  4. Hekainu

    Hekainu New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Hi, thanks for the replies and for fixing my photos.

    My camera mount is similar to this and it's reasonably stable so I don't think camera shake is the reason. (Link deleted by Mod)
    I use photoshop to sharpen up the images but it seems that the original images ought to be way sharper than they are and I'm just trying to salvage poor photos. The little red clay face for example is coming out really poorly.

    I've vaguely heard of focus stacking but have never tried it. I'll give it a go!

    Edit: My other query would be, what sort of aperture would you guys suggest would be better for this sort of photography? I tend to go fully manual and experiment with different shutter/apeture combinations but I assume that smaller apeture would be preferred due to better depth of field?

    Would it also help if I used a ring flash in addition to my lamps?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2017
  5. Roger S

    Roger S Crazy Canuck Administrator

    Messages:
    50,680
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    It would help if the EXIF were not stripped out of these uploads so that we could see the settings.

    The Sigma 105 has a few macro problems on it's own, not the least of which is the fact that it is almost impossible to auto focus in macro. You will get far sharper results by using manual focus at anything closer than 12 inches. The second thing about the lens is it's extremely small DOF when wide open as well as it's diffraction problems at anything tighter than f/16 in macro. You will be best using it between f/4 and f/16.
     
  6. gaelldew

    gaelldew Always on Premium Member

    Messages:
    4,915
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    There is no exif information in your shots so we are unable to see what your settings are with whichever lens you have used, if as you say you setup is stable you should be able to go to f18 at least to give you DOF. Have you checked your lens for front or rear focus as it is adjustable with the 7200, why not go to the " Who Are You " thread and introduce yourself.
     
    Roger S likes this.
  7. MikeB

    MikeB Always on Premium Member

    Messages:
    11,838
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    As above. Use the macro lens. Focus manually for critical images. Use f/8 for the aperture - depth of field is not an issue here. As the camera is mounted, let the camera determine exposure time using Aperture priority mode.
     
  8. mikew

    mikew Always on Premium Member

    Messages:
    1,893
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Are you shooting raw,if so the out of camera files will look very unsharp as nothing is done in camera to a raw file.

    If you are shooting jpeg which could work well for these images you must check your in camera settings for jpeg,Nikon cameras leave the factory with a very low sharpening setting on jpeg,i would bump this up to +5 or 7,if you are shooting jpeg make sure you have the highest quality setting.
     
  9. manishsoni

    manishsoni Member

    Messages:
    5
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    If you are shooting in Jpeg format then just check your camera setting. if you are shooting jpeg make sure you have the highest quality setting this will help you to get clear picture.

    The most important part of a camera is its lens since the quality of an image is so dependent upon it. The most basic camera body fitted with a good lens can make a good picture, but the best camera body in the world cannot make a good picture if its lens is of poor quality - if the image or parts of it are not in focus or if an inadequate amount of light for proper exposure reaches the film or the sensor in a digital camera.
     
  10. Hekainu

    Hekainu New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Hi guys, thanks for your help and suggestions. I tired the focus stacking technique and it has helped considerably. I did wonder how photographers manage to get small objects in focus from top to bottom! My images are now so much sharper. Raising the default sharpness setting of the camera also helped a lot as well!
     
  11. MikeB

    MikeB Always on Premium Member

    Messages:
    11,838
    Edit my images ?:
    Yes (recommended)
    Well done.
     

Share This Page