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Pushing Film

Discussion in 'Film and Vintage Forum' started by Kenyon11, May 10, 2017.

  1. Kenyon11

    Kenyon11 Member

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    Say if I were to push 100 to 400 what actually happens to the film? I understand that this will allow me to shoot things at 400iso which means that the image will be slightly more grainy. But what is the difference between pushing 100 to 400 over just shooting straight onto film which is meant to be shot at 400? Does it change anything?
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2017
    Mike Singh likes this.
  2. Mike Singh

    Mike Singh Always on

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    I think u get more contrast and grain. I just get my film developed my the pro labs!
     
  3. Kenyon11

    Kenyon11 Member

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    So I get more contrast if I push 100 to 400 over using straight up 400?
     
  4. john.margetts.ph

    john.margetts.ph Well-Known Member

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    You cannot really compensate for less exposure by increasing development. Increasing development increases contrast rather than increasing image density.

    If you do not want a high contrast negative, develop normally and accept a thin negative that should still print fine.

    Shooting 400 ISO film will give better negatives than reassigning 100 ISO film to 400 ISO. The only real reason for changing the EI (technically EI rather than ISO) is if you do not have the 400 ISO film available.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2017
  5. Kenyon11

    Kenyon11 Member

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    So am I right in saying that pushing 100 to 400 will take longer to develop? and by pushing it from 100 to 400 the image would have more contrast?
     
  6. Mike Singh

    Mike Singh Always on

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    I don't know but there are a lot of pushi film enthusiasts online!
     
  7. Nomad

    Nomad Always on

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    The film will be under-exposed, which means it will need to spend longer in the developer to get comparable negative density to a native 400asa film.

    However, this density only really occurs at the bits that have half-way adequate exposure to begin with - namely, the mid-tones and highlights. The shadows will have the least converted silver halide (because they got less light), and will develop fully but still lack density, while the mid-tones and highlights, while also under-exposed, can be developed to a greater relative density than the shadows because they have more converted silver halide for the developer to work with.

    This non-linear development is what results in greater contrast, which may or may not be desirable (ditto increase in grain size). The other downside is the loss of shadow detail - the under-exposure means that there is simply less there to develop, no matter how much development is given, which results in black, flat shadows with nothing to see.

    Unless you specifically want the look that pushed film gives, or have no choice (no fast film, can't get an exposure otherwise, etc), there isn't really much point in doing it. In other words, if you want a negative with normal contrast and decent shadow detail, using 400asa, then use 400asa film at 400, and develop normally.
     
    MikeB, paulmag and Mike Singh like this.

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