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Summary of the Camera industry for 2017

Discussion in 'Photography News Forum' started by DonS, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. DonS

    DonS Stuck in Toronto Moderator

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  2. steve b

    steve b Always on Premium Member

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    I guess it will all change, timing to get rid of gear at the optimum price will be crucial. Every time I pick up the 7D with 70-200 MkII attached I feel I'm handling a dinosaur to be. Then I read an article on studio bodies - entry level D3400 (£430), Intermediate 5D Mk4 (£3200) and the Pro Hasselblad H5D comes in at a massive £35,000!!!

    It will change - but when?
     
  3. MikeB

    MikeB Always on Premium Member

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    H
    hmmm, what is it that you expect or hope will change?
     
  4. steve b

    steve b Always on Premium Member

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    I don't hope Mike, but I think technology will make kit at pro level a lot smaller and lighter within the next decade.
     
  5. MikeB

    MikeB Always on Premium Member

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    There is no doubt that in 10 years the market will look completely different than it does today. I'm just not too sure what "Pro level" means. Even as sensor quality improves, there is still the issue of size. If a shallow depth of field is important to the professional photographer, then going to a smaller sensor will be compromising that benefit. Other aspects of professional cameras will be build quality and resolution. High build quality will always produce a relatively heavier camera body and larger sensors will always provide a better compromise of resolution and image quality. I think something like the Sony Alpha a7R III Mirrorless camera works well today. It's a full frame, professional camera weighing less than 1.5 lbs. with dimensions of only 5.0 x 3.8 x 2.9 inches is relatively light and small compared to many other professional SLRs. We also have professional level cameras with smaller sensors such as the Fujifilm TX cameras. As the sensor size drives lens size, I don't expect to see significant changes even in 10 years for lenses. I do expect big changes in batteries, smaller, more powerful, and less prone to blowing up. The biggest change factor appears to be consumers interest in photos and posting on social media. If our culture can move beyond sexting, selfies, and the photos of what one has been doing these last 10 minutes maybe we will see a greater interest in better photos rather than more photos.
     
  6. steve b

    steve b Always on Premium Member

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    I had that conversation today with my wife, no one in the family (including a web designer) is interested in quality, yet they take hundreds of cr*p phone pics. They are incapable of seeing the difference - the shooters shadow all over the subject, the squint horizons, the clutter in the background, they don't even make an effort, and worst of all, they just don't register the difference.
     
  7. Newbandit

    Newbandit Old Hand Premium Member

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    Some cameras are too small, so much they are unpleasant to hold ( Olympus OM stuff) and I really don't like the hug DOF you get will the 4/3rd cameras. I think we have hit a limit on useable resolution for most applications. Cameras will progress in hi ISO performance ( big deal) and will shoot huge frames per second ( Not my Thing) Creativity does not have a price tag. Some of the best images ever have already been taken...years ago.

    For me pro level is durability, weather sealing and ease of use.
     
  8. steve b

    steve b Always on Premium Member

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    I quite like the feel of my OM stuff and manage the buttons easily, the enormous menu is something else, a lot of it unnecessary IMO. I never got on with Canon G series, they're not much smaller but the buttons and controls are very congested. For handling, the weight of the 6D is perfect for me, and with a nifty attached, it's light but feels very user friendly. Although I'm not sure manufacturers listen to the people they produce for, the 'must have' factor takes over. Using phones as an example, they were fine in the early 90s, then they started to shrink to miniature size, the flat screen iphones came along and were a user-friendly size, now they're huge again, 14cm x 8 cm is my latest.
     
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  9. Newbandit

    Newbandit Old Hand Premium Member

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    The Olympus OM-1D MKII looks ok it has a decent grip on it. I would love to have a play with one for a day. No idea who might rent these out?
     
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