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Why are my photos such a failure?

Jivko1

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Feb 13, 2020
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Hi,
Could you please give an advise why my photos are so rubbish?
My camera is Panasonic Lumix G80, the lens Lumix G Vario 45-200mm f4.0-5.6
Here are the photos:
[link removed by moderator]
Any advise will be much appreciated!
Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DonS

Stuck in Toronto
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Two of the moderators looked at the link and could not get any photos to load on that site.

Perhaps try uploading a couple here and we can take a look and give some tips. Make sure they are no larger than 1024pixels on the longest side and under 250kb.
 

Jivko1

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Ok, turns out the link doesn't work. Not intended. And turns out the files are too large to be uploaded here. Please try here
Or here
Thanks!
 

rebel06

Taking it easy.
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Might be a good idea to read the forum rules first, that may help.
 

Snips

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Hi and welcome to the forum!

Re posting photographs, until you find another way (there are many), here's a useful website to resize your photographs so they are an acceptable size for attachments. This website can help with the 1024px and 250Kb (make it 240Kb to be safe) and then the forum can accept them. The reason for this size restriction is to keep costs down.

First off, your photographs are not a failure. Nor are they rubbish. They are all well exposed, the focus is good and for my part, although I haven't a clue where this town is, in the main they are a classic view of a Great Britain town and subsequently guessing, via a google search, Rochdale.

However, ... they could be better and I think what you're asking is how can I make them stronger or create more of an impact. Don't do yourself down - we were all beginners once! When I started photography I was asking the same sort of questions.

What I'm seeing here is too much detail and too much unwanted "stuff". Your subject tends to be in the background and not the main part of the photograph.

The worst composition for me is the car park with quarter of an out of focus car at the front, car park railings, cars parked, then a not unpleasant building at the rear. The eye is going all over the place until it settles somewhere.

Compare this photograph to the man in the street. A much simpler photograph and much more impact. What you first notice, despite the subject being the darkest part of the photograph, is the man walking away from you. The yellow lines are helping the eye lead you into the image as do the buildings on each side.

Patterns work in photography and the station roof is interesting but the image is spoilt by only seeing half of the train. Either include much more of it to show the scale or focus on the roof patterns.

The skies in all the photographs are not interesting so if the light/weather is against you, don't include it. This rule goes for anything. If you're photographing an overweight person sideways on, they won't want their shape shown, so crop the uninteresting part out. If you're photographing a sheep in a field, the subject of interest is the sheep, not the field so close in and crop out the field.

Returning to the man in the street, next time try getting right down to the road level and have the camera as close to the ground as possible and use a wide aperture. This should blur the foreground and have the man walking away in good focus with a blurred background. With your camera this won't be that noticeable but using the same distances you should see an improvement on what we see here. If you compare the first two photographs, the van image is so much stronger, this is what you can try with the street.

Comparing the first two photographs will emphasise the point I'm making. The first has a load of foreground which is adding nothing of interest whereas the second has the van as the immediate viewing point (brightest part of the image and quite central) but there is much less to distract you from the building in the background.

Photography is a wonderful world to explore and we all, including you(!), have our own styles and what we like to photograph and what we don't. If you're keen to learn more, and it sounds as if you are, might I suggest a fun and popular part of the forum which will initially take you out of your comfort zone - but it's a fantastic learning tool - Weekly Challenge Forum. You don't have to take part every week but each week a different subject will come up and you can post your efforts. This was how I left my initial comfort zone and really began to learn about composition and creating a reasonably decent photograph. Take part for quite a few weeks and this forum gets you out of the beginner stage.

Welcome, again, and if you have any questions there are loads of people on here happy to help and assist.
 

SharonH

Old Hand
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That's great information:) I think I need to write this somewhere and learn it too :)
 

MikeB

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@Jivko1, the Photography Forum is a safe place to view, share, and comment on a full range of photographs. Because it is a community, we have rules that we abide by to ensure everyone has equal access to our photographs and comments. We prefer to have all photos uploaded to this site rather than links - in that way all of the photos meet the same standards. Also, we consider sending members to a different site presents certain security issues that we would rather avoid.

Once you learn how to resize your photos and upload them here, simply place them in the proper category where you may request different levels of comment or critique.

Here's a link to our Purpose, Rules & Code of Conduct
 

breeliz

Here a lot
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Good photos can be the result of luck or planning. I can't help you with getting a lucky shot. But planning is something anyone can learn. Start with the basics... proper exposure, proper composition, interesting subject and good technique. You can Google articles and videos on each of these topics. Give them some study. Learn the basics of exposure and camera handling first. Study the things that make up exposure... aperture, shutter speed, ISO (film speed back in the day). Learn how to take photos in MANUAL mode so you understand how to get to proper exposure.

Study placement of the subject in the photo... how to frame the subject. Learn how to draw the viewer into the subject and then around to the rest of your photo. Learn how to avoid boring pictures like snapshots which are a dime a dozen. Make your pictures stand out.

Learn how to create interest in your subjects by seeing them in an unusual way. Sometimes that might mean getting in very close. At other times it may mean contrasting the subject with the background or some other object. There are more ways to create interest than there are stars in the sky but you have to start thinking that way. Interest loves to hide itself.

Lastly, Study your camera equipment and how it is best used. Read the manuals! Listen to video tutorials. Learn Learn Learn.

PS... Take pictures... hundreds and even thousands of pictures but think as you take them. Ask yourself questions about the things I mentioned above. You will find the quality of your pictures growing by leaps and bounds.
 

Jivko1

New Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
4
Photography Experience
Beginner
Photo Editing Experience
Beginner
Edit my images ?
No
Hi and welcome to the forum!

Re posting photographs, until you find another way (there are many), here's a useful website to resize your photographs so they are an acceptable size for attachments. This website can help with the 1024px and 250Kb (make it 240Kb to be safe) and then the forum can accept them. The reason for this size restriction is to keep costs down.

First off, your photographs are not a failure. Nor are they rubbish. They are all well exposed, the focus is good and for my part, although I haven't a clue where this town is, in the main they are a classic view of a Great Britain town and subsequently guessing, via a google search, Rochdale.

However, ... they could be better and I think what you're asking is how can I make them stronger or create more of an impact. Don't do yourself down - we were all beginners once! When I started photography I was asking the same sort of questions.

What I'm seeing here is too much detail and too much unwanted "stuff". Your subject tends to be in the background and not the main part of the photograph.

The worst composition for me is the car park with quarter of an out of focus car at the front, car park railings, cars parked, then a not unpleasant building at the rear. The eye is going all over the place until it settles somewhere.

Compare this photograph to the man in the street. A much simpler photograph and much more impact. What you first notice, despite the subject being the darkest part of the photograph, is the man walking away from you. The yellow lines are helping the eye lead you into the image as do the buildings on each side.

Patterns work in photography and the station roof is interesting but the image is spoilt by only seeing half of the train. Either include much more of it to show the scale or focus on the roof patterns.

The skies in all the photographs are not interesting so if the light/weather is against you, don't include it. This rule goes for anything. If you're photographing an overweight person sideways on, they won't want their shape shown, so crop the uninteresting part out. If you're photographing a sheep in a field, the subject of interest is the sheep, not the field so close in and crop out the field.

Returning to the man in the street, next time try getting right down to the road level and have the camera as close to the ground as possible and use a wide aperture. This should blur the foreground and have the man walking away in good focus with a blurred background. With your camera this won't be that noticeable but using the same distances you should see an improvement on what we see here. If you compare the first two photographs, the van image is so much stronger, this is what you can try with the street.

Comparing the first two photographs will emphasise the point I'm making. The first has a load of foreground which is adding nothing of interest whereas the second has the van as the immediate viewing point (brightest part of the image and quite central) but there is much less to distract you from the building in the background.

Photography is a wonderful world to explore and we all, including you(!), have our own styles and what we like to photograph and what we don't. If you're keen to learn more, and it sounds as if you are, might I suggest a fun and popular part of the forum which will initially take you out of your comfort zone - but it's a fantastic learning tool - Weekly Challenge Forum. You don't have to take part every week but each week a different subject will come up and you can post your efforts. This was how I left my initial comfort zone and really began to learn about composition and creating a reasonably decent photograph. Take part for quite a few weeks and this forum gets you out of the beginner stage.

Welcome, again, and if you have any questions there are loads of people on here happy to help and assist.
Thank You very much! Excellent ideas, thank You! This is Manchester, M11.
 

Ozzie_Traveller

Always on
Premium Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2018
Messages
1,120
Photography Experience
Advanced
Photo Editing Experience
Intermediate
Edit my images ?
Yes (recommended)
G'day Jivko

As others ^^ .... Welcome to the Foto Forum, you'll find heaps of fellow photographers here with heaps of experience and who are willing to share that experience

I am also a Panny FZ user - LOVE 'EM !! - so will be able to assist you with the Panny camera issues

However- most successful images start with the imagination, and from experience we build an image in our mind before pressing the button. Lighting angles - camera position - amount of zoom to alter perspective - day or night - sunrise or sunset ... and so it goes on

Looking at your Feb-13 album ~ because the sky seems dominated by bright clouds, there are few shadows. That makes a big difference [keep bright cloudy days for portraiture]. Some of your street scenes seem to have a camera position in the middle of the street making the image symmetrical ~ nothing wrong with this, but sometimes you can get a better impression by standing off centre so that one side of the road / buildings is more prominent. Try this with the alley-way shot

Hope this helps
Phil
 
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